Vancouver-based Dooly raises $80 million USD Series B round

Dooly co-founders

Vancouver-based software startup Dooly, which offers a connected workplace solution for sales professionals, has closed an $80 million USD Series B round of funding, bringing the startup’s total funding to date to $105 million USD.

News of the raise comes two months after Dooly announced $20.3 million in funding.

The round was led by Spark Capital, with participation from new investors Greenspring, Tiger Global, and Lachy Groom, and existing investors Boldstart Ventures, BoxGroup, and Addition. Will Reed of Spark Capital has joined Dooly’s board following the round. According to sources that spoke with TechCrunch, the new funding values Dooly at $300 million.

Founded in 2016 by CEO Kris Hartvigsen and CTO Justin Vaillancourt, Dooly offers software aimed to help sales professionals update Salesforce, take notes, and manage deals. Dooly instantly syncs notes to Salesforce, Slack, G-Suite, with the aim of preventing users from having to duplicate their work. The platform also uses artificial intelligence to surface “battlecards” based on the context of customer calls, so sales professionals can close more deals.

In a recent statement, Dooly said it currently helps power more than 500 companies, and its users span firms such as Asana, Airtable, BigCommerce, Contentful, Figma, Intercom, Lessonly, and Vidyard.

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News of the raise comes two months after Dooly announced $20.3 million in funding, which consisted of a 2020 seed round and Series A round. At the time Dooly announced those two rounds of funding, Hartvigsen told BetaKit Dooly saw significant growth amid the pandemic-fuelled shift to remote work. The CEO claimed Dooly’s user growth more than tripled since the start of the pandemic.

The company said the proceeds from its Series B round will be spent on talent and product development, which proceeds from the prior two rounds also went towards. Dooly will also use the Series B capital to evaluate use cases for expanding its offering to other professional departments, plans that Hartvigsen first indicated to BetaKit in March. Hartvigsen also noted in March the startup’s plans to scale to 50 employees by the end of this year.

Dooly was one of several Canadian tech companies that were able to profit amid the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on how we work. One such example is Synapse, another Toronto-based startup, which claimed to see an increase in demand for its e-learning software for corporate training programs and led the company to raise $2.64 million CAD in August.

Isabelle Kirkwood

Isabelle Kirkwood

Isabelle is a Vancouver-based writer with 5+ years of experience in communications and journalism and a lifelong passion for telling stories. For over two years, she has reported on all sides of the Canadian startup ecosystem, from landmark venture deals to public policy, telling the stories of the founders putting Canadian tech on the map.