Google reveals 12 startups in second cohort of Canadian accelerator

Google Accelerator Cohort

Google for Startups has revealed the 12 startups set to join the second annual cohort of its three-month accelerator program for early-stage Canadian tech ventures using machine learning or artificial intelligence (AI) in their business.

The accelerator, which serves seed to Series A-stage tech startups based in Canada,
aims to bring Google’s programs, products, people, and tech to startups that seek to leverage machine learning and AI to help them grow and scale.

“This year we’ve doubled down on our efforts to help startups and founders across Canada.”

This year’s program will include AccessNow, AVA, Homewise, ICwhatUC, Knockri, Neurescence, Orbiseed, Phelix AI, Summatti, Together, Virtuo, and Visualping.

“These 12 startups are using technology to solve an array of challenges, from a platform that streamlines the home buying process, to an AI-powered clinical assistant,” said Ashley Francisco, the head of startup developer ecosystems at Google Canada. “We’re inspired and honoured to work alongside these companies in the coming months to help navigate their most pressing technical and business needs.”

Participating startups will receive mentorship and technical product support from Google, and take part in workshops on product design, customer acquisition, and leadership development.

RELATED: Google to launch first Canadian accelerator in Kitchener-Waterloo

The program offers equity-free support, mentorship from over 20 Google teams, including Google Android, Cloud, Machine Learning, and Web. It also allows startups to partner on an advanced tech project, access Google’s network of industry experts and mentors, and provides participants with Google product credits and early access to the company’s new products and tools.

Google has five accelerators open to Canadian startups this year, including newly-launched Voice AI, one for Black founders, one for women founders and, most recently, opening up its climate change accelerator to startups across North America.

“This year we’ve doubled down on our efforts to help startups and founders across Canada,” said Francisco.

RELATED: Google opens two more accelerators to Canadian startups as remote becomes the new reality

The full list of startups in the 2021 cohort include:

AccessNow (Toronto) is a social enterprise focused on developing smart technology to connect people with disabilities, governments, and companies with accurate, up-to-date information about the accessibility of various places.

AVA (Vancouver) creates indoor gardening technology to help encourage people to grow their own food.

Homewise (Toronto) aims to automate the mortgage application process.

ICwhatUC (Calgary) is an augmented reality (AR) and AI-powered video platform that connects experts and customers to resolve maintenance issues, provide sales estimates, and conduct service training remotely.

Knockri (Toronto) is a behavioural skills assessment tool that aims to improve diversity without impacting work performance or hiring efficiency.

Neurescence (Toronto) combines machine learning with its proprietary optical technology to help solve critical medicinal and clinical challenges for overcoming neurological disorders.

Orbiseed (Toronto) applies AI to architecture, engineering, and construction workflows to increase efficiency, improve decision-making, and reduce business risk.

Phelix AI (Toronto) is an AI-based virtual assistant for healthcare workflows.

Summatti (Waterloo) is an AI-powered platform that summarizes customer and customer support team interactions in real-time across multiple channels.

Together (Toronto) provides software to help HR professionals launch, manage and measure mentoring programs for their employees at scale.

Virtuo (Calgary) is a platform that connects and streamlines the tasks associated with home-buying, including the purchase, finance, move, and settle-in process.

Visualping (Vancouver) is a robotic process automation startup that alerts users when something important changes on a webpage of their choice, such as laws and regulations or competitive intelligence.

Photo courtesy of Google Canada

Josh Scott

Josh Scott

Josh Scott is a BetaKit staff writer who loves to tell Canadian business and tech stories. His coverage is more complete than his moustache.