Volta Cohort invests $25,000 in five Atlantic Canada startups

Rovault, Clockk.io , Trip Ninja, Flock, and MyMem recieve $25,000 investment from Volta Cohort

Volta Labs’ first Volta Cohort Pitch Event, which took place on November 14 in Halifax, awarded five Atlantic Canadian technology startups an investment of $25,000.

Fifteen companies pitched their business to a panel of judges, including representatives from BDC Capital, Innovacorp, Volta Labs, and the region’s startup community.

This initiative was led by Volta Cohort, a microfund co-founded by Volta Labs, BDC Capital and Innovacorp.

“The quality of the pitches made this decision very competitive. We are looking forward to providing these high potential founders with the opportunity to demonstrate some meaningful success,” said Jesse Rodgers, CEO of Volta Labs and member of the judging panel.

The companies chosen to join the first Volta Cohort were:

  • Trip Ninja: uses search technology to offer travelers flexibility and find them savings on airfare for multi-city trips.
  • Rovault: a startup that designs camera systems that help shrimp processing facilities improve the industry’s average yield.
  • Clockk.io: a SaaS tool that aims to solve the timesheet problem for digital agencies and software consultancies.
  • MyMem: helps dementia patients hold on to their memories and experiences by creating a digital “life story book.”
  • Flock: a SaaS knowledge collection platform that facilitates onboarding for freelancers and new employees.
  • Along with the investment, the selected companies will also receive mentorship from experienced entrepreneurs and resources to help them grow their businesses. Applications for the next Volta Cohort, which will take place in six months, are now open.

    Aeman Ansari

    Aeman Ansari

    Aeman Ansari is a freelance writer who has been published in many Toronto-based publications, including Hazlitt and Torontoist. When she’s not re-watching Hitchcock movies, she’s working on her collection of short fiction inspired by stories from her grandmother, one of the few women in India to receive post-secondary education in English literature at the time.