Telus report says 89 percent of Canadians believe that tech will lead to better healthcare

TELUS

Canadians want the medley of tasks they can accomplish online to extend to healthcare, according to a recent Telus report.

The study shows that 89 percent of Canadians believe that digital technology will lead to better care, and that 85 percent of Canadians are not taking advantage of what tools are already available.

On the other hand, only 15 percent of those surveyed reported using digital tools to manage any aspect of their healthcare and approximately 48 percent are unaware that such tools are even available at medical offices, clinics and pharmacies.

“Our health is our most prized possession, and Canadians may not realize that by embracing technology we can all better manage our health and the health of our loved ones,” said Hélène Chartier, vice president of strategy and enablement at Telus Health, in a statement.

“Whether it’s to refill your prescription online or to get an alert when your child’s medication runs low, we all need to ask our doctors how we can do more to technology to help understand our health.”

Eighty-one percent of those surveyed believe that health information should be shared digitally between doctors and pharmacists and 75 percent of respondents believe that electronic prescriptions would reduce the number of medical errors.

The study also reported regional-specific numbers, which revealed that Quebecers are the most active users of digital health technology.

“Technology is already changing how doctors care for and treat their patients,” says Dr. Robert Pontbriand from the Centre de médecine sportive de Laval. in a statement sent to MobileSyrup.

“Today I can review a patient’s medical file from a secure mobile app on my smartphone or a tablet anytime and anywhere. I’m now able to devote more time to delivering high-quality care to my patients.”

Even so, 79 percent of Quebecers surveyed do not take advantage of the digital health services already available in Canada.

While these results demonstrate a strong desire among Canadians to integrate digital health technologies into their healthcare routine, it’s clear that most Canadians will be looking to increase their health-tech literacy in the future.

This survey was conducted between May 30th and June 3rd, 2016 by Maru/VCR&C. 1,009 Canadians over the age of 18 were surveyed for this study, which was reported with a margin of error of +/- 3.1%.

This article was originally published on MobileSyrup.