Virtual care software startup OnCall Health raises $7.9 million CAD Series A

OnCall Health

Toronto-based startup OnCall Health, which provides virtual care software to healthcare providers, has raised a $7.9 million CAD ($6 million USD) Series A round, bringing the company’s total funding to date to over $10.5 million CAD ($8 million USD).

“Our vision is to provide a Shopify-like experience to enable any organization to streamline and successfully deliver virtual care.”

Base10 Partners led the round, and OnCall Health’s existing investors, Ripple Ventures, Panache Ventures, and Stout Street Capital participated. OnCall Health will use the new funding to expand its customers across North America, build out its available integrations and developer tools, and grow its partnerships with payers and software vendors.
 

“COVID-19 has massively accelerated the pace of virtual care adoption, and reinforced the need for every healthcare clinic, system, and brand to have a virtual care strategy,” said Nicholas Chepesiuk, founder and CEO of OnCall Health.

Founded in 2016, OnCall enables healthcare enterprises to rapidly launch their own virtual care platform that is highly configurable to their brand and workflow. The startup also offers a real-time virtual care analytics dashboard, automated patient triage, self-scheduling, payment processing, insurance billing, and online prescriptions.

Since being launched, OnCall Health raised a $2 million seed round, and its team has grown to just over 30 full-time employees. The startup claims it currently supports over 600 healthcare organizations and more than 7,000 primary care, mental health, and paramedical service providers in North America.

RELATED: How COVID-19 set the stage for a Canadian healthtech boom

OnCall Health also claims it has increased the number of appointments scheduled on its platform by fivefold in terms of year-over-year growth, and hosts one million virtual healthcare appointments each year.

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for virtual healthcare has led to many scaling opportunities for Canadian healthtech startups. In recent months, companies like Maple and Inkblot Therapy claim to have seen notable growth in partnerships and corporate client sign-ups, respectively, during the pandemic. This week, Maple also closed $75 million from one of its partners, Shoppers Drug Mart.

Image courtesy OnCall Health.

Isabelle Kirkwood

Isabelle Kirkwood

Writer, globetrotter, drone pilot & David Attenborough enthusiast