Ryerson IEEE Explores Intersection between Fashion & Tech

On Tuesday night, Ryerson University’s student chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) hosted an event exploring the intersection of fashion and technology.

More than 150 people gathered in the Sears Atrium building to discover the future possibilities for wearable technology. Seasoned companies like Muse and MeU showcased their products alongside startups from the Ryerson Fashion Zone and the Department of Computer Science. 

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SubPac is a wearable bass system that transfers low frequencies to your body to provide a new dimension to the music experience.

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EchoSence, by Jamie Gao, Joseph Wan, and Shahnewaz Howlander, is a device designed to help visually impaired people navigate the world. It uses ultrasound sensors and sound waves to “scan” the environment and help judge distance.

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Academics from Network-Centric Applied Research Team (N-CART) show off their Canine Augmentation Technology (CAT), a wearable tech device for search and rescue dogs. Dogs are equipped with wireless video, audio, telemetry, and sensing systems to help their human handlers search for survivors and deploy medical and emergency supplies.

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A wearable drone that folds up inside a backpack on display at Ryerson’s IEEE Fashion/Tech Showcase.

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Attendees try on Muse, a brain-sensing headband that helps train the brain for mindfulness and relaxation.

While fashion and engineering students don’t normally brush elbows, the burgeoning industry of wearable technology is demanding these two disciplines create and collaborate together.

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Fashion/tech startup D-Stress wants to make a bracelet that uses aromatherapy technology to help people relax.

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Fashion startup Anese Bra is designed with responsive fabrics that expand and contract as breast sizes change.

“We wanted to show students the possibility and potential for wearable technology” said co-organizer Corronzo Downey. “We also wanted to seize the opportunity to bring different disciplines together and introduce people to new advancements in technology.”

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From L to R, IEEE fashion /tech event organizer Corronzo Downey, advisor Simran Kamboj and organizer Jeffery Poon.

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PlexiDrone wants to make aeiral photography and videography easier by making simple drones small enough to fit inside a backpack. Their project is currently on Indiegogo.

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Martin Labrecque, CEO of BreqLabs shows off his Exoglove, a computer-interfaced glove that could be used for gaming or as an assistive wearable mouse.

Photos by Amanda Cosco. 

Amanda Rebecca Cosco

Amanda Rebecca Cosco

Amanda Rebecca Cosco is a multimedia journalist focused on the intersection of fashion and technology. To pitch her a story, email her at amandarebeccacosco@gmail.com. Catch her on Twitter @AmandaCosco