Legal Innovation Zone announces AI Legal Challenge finalists

Legal Innovation Zone Bootcamp

The Legal Innovation Zone (LIZ) at Ryerson University has announced the six stage one finalists of the Ontario AI Legal Challenge.

LIZ is a co-working space and a legal tech incubator working to build legal solutions for the legal services industry. The challenge was launched in partnership with the Ministry of the Attorney General (MAG) in September 2017 that offers $80,000 in seed funding, and seeks startups using AI to make legal services or processes more efficient.

“We have an opportunity to harness cutting-edge technology like artificial intelligence and introduce it to the justice field to develop solutions that help people resolve their legal issues faster and easier. With our government’s support, the AI Legal Challenge will create new products and services that will help lawyers and consumers, and increase access to justice,” said Attorney General Yasir Naqvi. “I am very eager to see the result of the energy and creativity devoted to this challenge as these ideas come to life through the Legal Innovation Zone.”

The six startups will have access to LIZ’s workspace, mentors, advisors, and other resources for the next four months while they prepare for the Final Pitch. The last stage of the contest will take place in March 2018, and three winning startups will be awarded seed money totalling in $80,000.

The stage one winners include Destin AI, Diligen, Evichat, Legalicity, Loom Analytics, and Splyt.

“AI has the potential to revolutionize legal services, in the same way it is starting to change so much of life beyond the law,” said Chris Bentley, Managing Director of the LIZ. “Consumers will benefit from the better legal solutions that result when the entrepreneurs who see the possibilities are supported and encouraged.”

Photo via The Legal Innovation Zone at Ryerson University 

Aeman Ansari

Aeman Ansari

Aeman Ansari is a freelance writer who has been published in many Toronto-based publications, including Hazlitt and Torontoist. When she’s not re-watching Hitchcock movies, she’s working on her collection of short fiction inspired by stories from her grandmother, one of the few women in India to receive post-secondary education in English literature at the time.