Dream Payments launches POS app as part of US expansion

dream payments

Dream Payments, a Toronto-based payment cloud provider, is further expanding its reach in the US with the launch of a point of sale app.

The FinTech announced Dream Payments Point of Sale (POS), which is designed to work with First Data’s Clover payment devices. The app works to power mobile commerce and payment services for merchants across North America. In particular, it provides this service for businesses including retailers, restaurants, salons, and healthcare providers across the United States.

“We are proud to deliver a smart point of sale that works seamlessly with Clover smart payment terminals for merchants across the USA,” said Brent Ho-Young, CEO of Dream Payments. “Retail is going through a once-in-a-generation transformation. Small and mid-sized businesses are demanding commerce solutions that free them from behind their counters and deliver frictionless checkout experiences in-store and on-the-go. With Dream Payments POS and its seamless integration into Clover, Dream has democratized access for any sized business to a powerful commerce platform that traditionally only the largest retailers could afford.”

According to Dream Payments, the four key qualities of this product are that it provides a variety of features (accepting payments, issuing receipts and customizing and managing a product catalogue), accepts all types of payments from customers, and instantly updates QuickBooks Online after each transaction.

The launch of this app is just a part of the company’s efforts to continue its US push. In March, Dream Payments announced$ 10 million in funding for expansion to the US. Its goal is to demonstrate the importance of upgrading to technology that accepts all forms of payments to merchants all over North America.

Live demonstrations of the app will be available at the Money2020 Conference between October 23 to October 25.

Aeman Ansari

Aeman Ansari

Aeman Ansari is a freelance writer who has been published in many Toronto-based publications, including Hazlitt and Torontoist. When she’s not re-watching Hitchcock movies, she’s working on her collection of short fiction inspired by stories from her grandmother, one of the few women in India to receive post-secondary education in English literature at the time.