Report: Canadian consumers set to lead the way in IoT adoption

IoT

In a joint survey published by Primus Telecommunications Canada and Ryerson University’s DMZ, about 1,000 Canadians weighed in on what ways they could see the Internet of Things (IoT) playing a role in their lives.

The study found that Canadians don’t think too highly of themselves when it comes to technology – 42 per cent disagree that Canada is ahead of the curve when it comes to technology. Conversely, 83 per cent agree that they are willing to try new technology to make their lives easier, while 68 per cent agree that connected devices will make their lives easier, which shows a higher level of tech savvy than the participants gave themselves credit for.

39 per cent of Canadians surveyed reported concern for their privacy when it comes to IoT.

Canadians also seem more likely to adopt IoT devices as 76 per cent say they own a smartphone, and 60 per cent admitted that they like to be connected to the Internet at all times – part of a growing worldwide trend as, according to the GSM Association that represents mobile providers, mobile connections worldwide are set to reach 10 billion by 2020.

“With a strong communications infrastructure, ample bandwidth and some of the top technology talent in the world, Canada has the potential to lead in the creation and adoption of products and services related to the Internet of Things,” said Dr. Hossein Rahnama, research and innovation director at the DMZ.

But while Canadians are excited to adopt IoT, the post-Snowden era has had some effect on its perception, as 39 per cent reported concern for their privacy. For this reason, Brad Fisher, senior vice president and product strategy leader at Primus, says that telecommunications companies need to take the lead in making this technology safer and easier to access.

“We need to ensure these businesses get the support and access they need so that Canada can realize its full potential in driving the design and adoption of the Internet of Things,” Fisher said.

Jessica Galang

Jessica Galang

Freelance tech writer. Former BetaKit News Editor.